Archive for blondie

The Washington Post Gets Beyond the Robot

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2016 by Gary Lachman

Here’s the kind of review every writer wants. Michael Dirda, the Post’s regular reviewer and a Pulitzer Prize winner, gives his readers two reasons to get Beyond The Robot: The Life and Work of Colin Wilson. I’ll give you one guess what they are.

Jeffrey J. Kripal asks me all about our Secret Teachers

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 13, 2016 by Gary Lachman

I recently had the great pleasure of being interviewed by Jeffrey J. Kripal about my new book The Secret Teachers of the Western World for the Reality Sandwich website. For those of you who don’t know, Jeffrey is one of the most exciting and thought provoking academic thinkers working in the ‘alternative’ milieu today; among his many books are Mutants and MysticsAuthors of the Impossible and most recently, The Super Natural, co-written with Whitley Strieber. I am flattered and honored that Jeff took the time to read and think about my book and to ask the kinds of questions writers like to answer. Here’s a link to the interview.

The Secret Teachers at Aeon Byte

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2016 by Gary Lachman

Have a listen to a conversation about all things secret and gnostic with Miguel Connor and me at Aeon Byte.

An interview with me for Conscious Bridge

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2016 by Gary Lachman

Back in 2014 Mark Gilbert interviewed me for an article he had in mind for Science of Mind magazine. As often happens in the world of journalism, the article didn’t appear but Mark kept the recording of our chat and he recently posted it on his Conscious Bridge website. We talked about quite a few things, so many in fact that Mark edited the interview into three parts. In the first part, posted here, I talk about my reading habits in my late teens, my introduction to the occult, and my early days playing rock and roll.

Secret Teachers at the New York Journal of Books

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2016 by Gary Lachman

Here’s a review of The Secret Teachers of the Western World at the New York Journal of Books.  I am glad the reviewer pointed this out: “This narrative of the history of these ideas could be stultifying or confusing for non-specialists and the curious. Luckily Mr. Lachman creates a history of ideas that fascinates and excites.” That’s what a good history of ideas should do.

Speaking Hermetically at Rune Soup

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 28, 2016 by Gary Lachman

Here’s a link to a recent interview I did with Gordon White at his excellent website RuneSoup. Gordon did his homework and our talk covered a great deal of ground. We focused on my new book The Secret Teachers of the Western World but our conversation ranged far and wide with much in between. Check it out when you can and be sure to listen to some of Gordon’s other chats.

An Interview for the Jean Gebser Society

Posted in Introduction, Notebook with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 19, 2016 by Gary Lachman

Here’s a link to a recent interview I did with Aaron Cheak for the Jean Gebser Society. Gebser is one of the most important philosophers of the last century, and as you most likely know, I write about him in several of my books: A Secret History of ConsciousnessThe Quest for Hermes TrismegistusRevolutionaries of the Soul and my most recent book, The Secret Teachers of the Western World. The theme of the interview is the link between western philosophy and esotericism, but as you’ll see we cover a lot of ground, from my first introduction to these ideas to my latest approach to them. Aaron Cheak has done some very interesting work on Gebser, digging into his biography and associations with people like the poet Frederico Garcia Lorca, and he is currently translating more of Gebser’s work into English. I will certainly be happy to see this, as Gebser is so far under-translated and we can use as much of him as we can get.