Tag: Theosophy

Happy New Year

And may 2019 be gentle to us all. Many thanks to all of you for making 2018 possible. Without you it couldn’t have happened. That’s something to think about. In the meantime, I wish I could give you all something in return. Alas, all I have is a link to my latest interview with Jeffrey Mishlove for his excellent New Thinking Allowed series. It’s about Madame Blavatsky. She may have been teetotal, but I bet New Years’s Eve was a hoot – or a Koot Hoomi – with her around. My next interview with Jeffrey, about Colin Wilson, will be released in January, and I’ll post the link when it is. Until then, all the best and sincere wishes for a truly human new year.

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Imagination at Midnight

Recently I gave a talk to the Theosophical Society here in London about my book Lost Knowledge of the Imagination. Here’s a link to the video of the talk. I’m always happy to speak at the TS. The audience is always intelligent and friendly and open to new ideas.

In other news, I’m being interviewed on the late Art Bell’s radio program, Midnight in the Desert, this Wednesday evening, December 12, at 11:00 Pacific Time. I’m getting up at 6:00 AM on Thursday morning in order to do it, compliments of the time difference between London and the west coast. Dave Schrader is at the helm these days. I did wonder if they knew that Midnight on the Desert is the title of an autobiographical book by J. B. Priestley? They do now because I told them. In any case, it looks like it will be a broad conversation about my work in general. They take questions, so if you are up and listening, please check in.

Thinking Allowed

Recently I was interviewed by Jeffrey Mishlove for his Thinking Allowed series of podcasts. This is the first of what will most likely turn out to be several such conversations. We talked about Rudolf Steiner in this one, and yesterday Jeffrey interviewed me about my book Dark Star Rising. The next installment we have planned is a chat about Madame Blavatsky. I enjoy Jeffrey’s interviews; he clearly knows the subjects and he guarantees a good discussion by asking intelligent questions. Here’s one place in which thinking is definitely allowed.

Occult Politics in Spain

I’ve recently heard from Javier Sierra, author of the bestselling The Secret Supper, that the Spanish edition of Politics and the Occult will be released in May. Javier is responsible for having the book come out with Planeta, and for arranging for me to take part in the International Symposium for Occulture that will take place in Madrid and Leon in October. I’ve been reading Javier’s latest work, The Master of the Prado, about the hidden influence of occult ideas on much of western art, and am finding it fascinating. Oddly enough, I’ve also recently heard that the Spanish edition of The Caretakers of the Cosmos has also just come out, with IAO Arte Editorial.  With Ediciones Atalanta publishing Spanish editions of my Rudolf Steiner and A Secret History of Consciousness, it looks like I am fairly well represented in the Spanish speaking world.

Jeffrey J. Kripal asks me all about our Secret Teachers

I recently had the great pleasure of being interviewed by Jeffrey J. Kripal about my new book The Secret Teachers of the Western World for the Reality Sandwich website. For those of you who don’t know, Jeffrey is one of the most exciting and thought provoking academic thinkers working in the ‘alternative’ milieu today; among his many books are Mutants and MysticsAuthors of the Impossible and most recently, The Super Natural, co-written with Whitley Strieber. I am flattered and honored that Jeff took the time to read and think about my book and to ask the kinds of questions writers like to answer. Here’s a link to the interview.

Secret Teachers at the Library Journal

Here is a review of The Secret Teachers of the Western World from the Library Journal:

Library Journal

11/15/2015
Lachman (Evolution of Consciousness, California Inst. of Integral Studies; Politics of the Occult) presents this work as “a serious study of our ‘rejected knowledge’ and an engagement with some of the people pursuing it today” and successfully achieves his first goal of a scholarly study of the “rejected” knowledge of the Western esoteric tradition. This comprehensive history engagingly traces a way of thinking and living that was often at the margins of accepted Western society. While it would be easy to sensationalize such a past, Lachman deftly navigates between the extremes of presenting a unified “conspiracy” behind hermeticism and a polemical attack on its opponents. It is an academic work, not a practitioner’s guide, which ranges from discussions on Plato to Carl Jung and onto the New Age as well as current explorations in alternative spiritual traditions. Lachman further briefly considers important mystics from the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions who informed the esoteric tradition. VERDICT This solid introduction to occult and esoteric history provides a sensible foundation for any reader who finds appeal in the current interest in participatory spirituality as distinct from simply holding specific religious beliefs.—Daniel Wigner, South Plains Coll., Lubbock, TX