Tag: consciousness

On the Road Again: Talks in October and November in New York, Montreal, Berlin, and London

Here’s a list of some talks I’ll be giving in North America and Europe in October and November.

October 4-6: I’ll be at the Omega Studios in Rhinebeck, NY, along with Dean Radin, Alex and Allyson Grey, and Regina Meredith for a weekend of Real Magic. Really. Some seats are still available.

October 11-13: I’ll be lighting up at the Black Flame Esoteric Conference in Montreal, Canada, with an impressive array of other speakers, including Helene Arts, Richard Kaczynski, and Shani Oates. Come shine in the darkness.

October 15: I will be talking about my book Dark Star Rising: Magick and Power in the Age of Trump at the Colloquium for Unpopular Culture, in NYC’s Greenwich Village. Room 106, 244 Greene Street [between Washington and Waverly Place]

October 16: I will be talking about my book Lost Knowledge of the Imagination at The Alchemist’s Kitchen in some other old stomping grounds, NYC’s East Village.

October 24: I will be talking about my book The Dedalus Book of Literary Suicides: Dead Letters at Highgate Cemetery in North London as part of the London Month of the Dead festivities. Come and discover why and how writers have been cashing in their chips throughout the centuries.

October 31-November 3: I will be giving the keynote talk at the Occulture Conference in Berlin, Germany. Sicher sehr esoterisch…

November 25: I’ll be talking about Esoteric London as part of the London History Festival at Kensington Central Library. Find out what John Dee, Swedenborg, Madame Blavatsky, P.D. Ouspensky and other esoteric characters did in the Big Smoke.

November 30: I’ll be joining Richard Tarnas, Mark Vernon, David Lorimer and other speakers for a day exploring ideas about the evolution of consciousness at Colet House, where Ouspensky held his meetings in the 1930s. Come to Evolving Consciousness: Spiritual Experience in a Secular Age.

Jung at Heart and a Trip Down Under

Here is a link to my latest conversation with Jeffrey Mishlove. This time we take on Jung, and of course we can only scratch the surface.

On a different note, here is short notice for a trip down under. I’ll be in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia, in August, giving some talks. The idea of my heading there has been in the planning stage for quite some time, but it wasn’t until last month that it seemed it would really happen.

Here are the links for my talks in Sydney, on Dark Star Rising and Hypnagogia, the strange intermediary state of consciousness between sleeping and waking, with which many who attend my lectures are familiar… And here’s a link to a weekend devoted to A Secret History of Consciousness and Lost Knowledge of the Imagination.

And here is the information I have for my talks in Melbourne. Contact details are sadly missing but I’m working on getting them:

GARY LACHMAN – LECTURES IN MELBOURNE

DOCKLANDS

Saturday 3 August DOCKLANDS: Library at The Dock, Level 2, 107 Victoria Harbour Promenade, Cnr. Collins & Bourke Sts, VIC, 3008

10:00 – 11:30am – A LOOK INSIDE THE WORLD, our ancestors saw a living nature rather than a mechanical one. This vision informed Goethe’s view of the world and we can discover how to use this vision today.

2:00 – 3:30pm – A DIFFERENT KIND OF KNOWING, before reason, logic and “facts”, a knowing based on the total picture of reality prevailed. Throughout history there have been individuals who have combined both “facts” and the bigger picture.

WARRANWOOD

Sunday 4 August WARRANWOOD: The Michael Centre, 37A Wellington Park Drive, VIC 3134,  VIC

 2:00pm – 4:00pm – THE CARETAKERS OF THE COSMOS Living Responsibly in an Unfinished World, looking at how ancient ideas about our place in the world can unite with those of some of the most important but little known sages of recent times to envision a future in which we “take care of the cosmos” by becoming “fully human”.

 

A Conversation about Imagination

Here’s a link to my latest interview with Jeffrey Mishlove on his excellent Thinking Allowed You Tube channel. This time it’s about the lost knowledge of the imagination. As always with Jeffrey, it’s a wide-ranging and with any luck stimulating discussion.

If you’re interested in following up with a look at the book, you can find it here. For those of you in the UK, here’s where to go.

And, if you haven’t had enough of imagination, here’s my interview about it for Interalia Magazine.

Also, there are still places available for my seminar on imagination at the Omega Studios in Rhinebeck, NY, in October 4-6. I’ll be there with Dean Radin, Alex and Allyson Gray, and Regina Meredith.

I’m also speaking at the Black Flame conference in Montreal, Oct 11-13.

I am setting up some dates in NYC in October as well, and will post these when they are definite.

Advanced notice: From Lost Knowledge to Real Magic: Omega Workshop this October.

I’ll be sharing the bill with Dean Radin, Alex and Allyson Grey, and Regina Meredith at the Omega Workshops in Rhinebeck, New York, this October. From Lost Knowledge to Real Magic: https://www.eomega.org/workshops/real-magic. My first NY appearance since – well, even I don’t remember. I know its some time away but I thought it wouldn’t hurt to get word out sooner rather than later. If you can make it it would be great to see you there.

Happy New Year

And may 2019 be gentle to us all. Many thanks to all of you for making 2018 possible. Without you it couldn’t have happened. That’s something to think about. In the meantime, I wish I could give you all something in return. Alas, all I have is a link to my latest interview with Jeffrey Mishlove for his excellent New Thinking Allowed series. It’s about Madame Blavatsky. She may have been teetotal, but I bet New Years’s Eve was a hoot – or a Koot Hoomi – with her around. My next interview with Jeffrey, about Colin Wilson, will be released in January, and I’ll post the link when it is. Until then, all the best and sincere wishes for a truly human new year.

Imagination at Midnight

Recently I gave a talk to the Theosophical Society here in London about my book Lost Knowledge of the Imagination. Here’s a link to the video of the talk. I’m always happy to speak at the TS. The audience is always intelligent and friendly and open to new ideas.

In other news, I’m being interviewed on the late Art Bell’s radio program, Midnight in the Desert, this Wednesday evening, December 12, at 11:00 Pacific Time. I’m getting up at 6:00 AM on Thursday morning in order to do it, compliments of the time difference between London and the west coast. Dave Schrader is at the helm these days. I did wonder if they knew that Midnight on the Desert is the title of an autobiographical book by J. B. Priestley? They do now because I told them. In any case, it looks like it will be a broad conversation about my work in general. They take questions, so if you are up and listening, please check in.

Learning the Lost Knowledge

Next month and into early December, I’ll be giving a three week live online course at Nura Learning, based on my book Lost Knowledge of the Imagination. The course will cover material from that book, as well as from The Secret Teachers of the Western World and A Secret History of Consciousness. With all these secrets and lost knowledge available to us, we should be able to have an interesting time.

You can find a description of the class, some ideas of what it will cover, and other useful information at the Nura Learning site.  Here’s a preview. See you there perhaps.

 

When we hear the word “imagination,” what do we think? Mostly we tend to see the imagination as a substitute for reality, as a form of wishful thinking, a pleasant alternative to the hard facts of life. Or we see it as a way of developing novel ideas, of being on the “cutting edge” of technology, a way of making things “bigger and better.”

But this is not the only way to understand the imagination. For poets and scholars like Kathleen Raine, Henry Corbin, Owen Barfield and others, the imagination is not a substitute for reality, but a means of grasping its essence. For them, imagination isn’t a form of “make believe,” but a faculty of cognition, a way of knowing things that would otherwise remain unknown.

This knowledge was accessible at earlier times, but in recent centuries it has been minimized, if not vigorously rejected, by our emphasis on “hard,” “scientistic” thinking. This course will look at imagination as a faculty for grasping the invisible realities that surround us, and at the tradition of knowledge rooted in it. A tradition that, if lost, can still be recovered.