Tag: Gary Lachman

Seeing the Invisible, Hearing Lost Knowledge

My talk at the Center for Contemporary Culture Barcelona (CCCB) last week on the influence of the occult on art – part of their fantastic Black Light Exhibition – went over well. The audience – more than a hundred people – seemed to enjoy it, and although there were some slight technical problems – rooted in my clumsiness with the universal translator – I count it as a success. The curator, Enrique Juncosa, is a charming, intelligent character and it was a delight to speak with him about the ways in which the mystical, the magical, and the esoteric have informed much of the art of modern times, and what they are getting up to in it today.

I’ve contributed an essay to the exhibition catalog, La Luz Negra (“Black Light”). Two friends have also contributed pieces: Erik Davis, of Techgnosis fame and the curator Cristina Recupero, with whom I worked on the Geheim Gesellschaften (“Secret Societies”) exhibition held in Frankfurt and Bordeaux in 2011. The catalog is tri-lingual, with Spanish-English and Catalan-English editions. If you are interested in occulture and can make it to Barcelona, the exhibition is well worth the trip. If you can’t go that far, the catalog can give you an idea of what you are missing.

As for my talk, here’s the link to the video. There is a brief introduction by Enrique, then the talk. In the Q & A that followed, I speak a bit about Dark Star Rising, which will be released on 29 May. Among other things I raise an interesting point: Is a tulpa sitting in the White House? What’s a tulpa? That’s a good question and I give some ideas of an answer in the book.

In other news, the audio book of Lost Knowledge of the Imagination is available. Here’s the link. It’s also available at amazon.com  There’s a free trial offer or you can purchase it separately. I haven’t heard it yet and look forward to hearing my words in – well, not exactly print but you get the idea. There’s also an interview with Mark Jeftovic, who produced the audio book.

It looks like it’s going to be a busy summer.

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And The Beast Goes On…

Here’s the link to the second part of my talk on Aleister Crowley, given at the Kensington Central Library on March 15th. My sense of time tends to dilate when I give a talk, and before I know it I’ve covered a mere fraction of what I had intended to when I’m being signaled to cut to the chase. Never fear. As I shamefacedly say in the talk, you can get the full story here, if you haven’t already.

I should mention that my  next talk on Crowley, for the Century Club in London’s Soho, is sold out, as is a talk I am giving in May on Madame Blavatsky. That’s an encouraging sign. There are places left though for two other talks I’m giving in London in June. One is on P.D. Ouspensky, on his life and work in London during the years entre deux guerres, again at Kensington Central Library. The other is on Owen Barfield, at Rudolf Steiner House ,on June 5. It isn’t listed yet on the Rudolf Steiner House web site but will be soon I imagine.

I’ve also heard that the audio version of Lost Knowledge of the Imagination will be available soon. When it is you’ll be among the first to know. I am also giving an online course based on the book for the summer semester of the California Institute of Integral Studies. Any knowledge we find I’ll be sure to share with you.

Crowley at Kensington Library and a teaser for Dark Star Rising

Here’s a link to a video of a talk on Aleister Crowley I gave last month at the Kensington Central Library here in London. I’m editing the second part of the talk, based on my book Aleister Crowley: Magick, Rock and Roll, and the Wickedest Man in the World,  and will post that soon. Also, here’s a link to a teaser for Dark Star Rising, which will be released at the end of May (end of June in the UK). This short piece originally appeared in New Dawn magazine and a slightly longer version, given here, turned up in Fortean Times. I’ll be writing a longer piece for the FT based on the book, which should come out around the same time as the book’s UK publication. And an upcoming issue of New Dawn will carry an article of mine on the Jordan Peterson phenomenon.

In other news, the narrator for the Dark Star Rising audio book has been chosen. His name is Jason Culp. I don’t know his work but his voice stood out among the other candidates and I’m glad Brilliance Audio went with him. A brief mention of myself and the book appears in this Wired article about the apparent rise of occultism associated with Trump’s presidency. Years from now a later generation may ask: where were you when the singularity got into the White House?

20% Discount on my titles at Floris Books

The generous people at Floris Books are offering a 20% discount on my titles from now until the end of April. Along with Lost Knowledge of the Imagination, this includes The Caretakers of the CosmosThe Quest for Hermes Trismegistus, Rudolf Steiner, and A Secret History of Consciousness. Here’s what you need to know:
Code: LA0218
Offer: 20% off all books written by Gary Lachman when purchased via
Valid until: 30/04/18
And as a starter, here’s a brief excerpt from Lost Knowledge of the Imagination.

 

There are of course many books on the imagination. Psychological studies, motivational works, instructions in visualization, research into creativity, guides to using imagination in business, relationships, and self-improvement – these are some of the results that come from a quick internet search on the subject. There are many more. Most definitions of imagination speak of its contrast with reality. My Oxford Dictionary tells me that imagination is the ‘mental faculty of forming images or concepts of objects or situations not existent or not directly experienced.’ Merriam-Webster tells me it is ‘the ability to imagine things that are not real’ – which seems something of a tautology – and ‘something that only exists or happens in your mind.’ The Cambridge Dictionary says that imagination is ‘the ability to form pictures in the mind’ and that it concerns ‘something that you think exists or is true, although in fact is not real or true’. Imagination is of course also creative. Roget’s Thesaurus calls it the ‘power to create in one’s mind,’ and samples of the synonyms it provides range from  ‘artistry,’ ‘awareness,’ and ‘inspiration’, to ‘ingenuity,’ ‘insight’ and ‘creativity’.

I believe imagination is one of those things which we all know immediately but which, as I’ve said, we would find difficult to define. Indeed, an exact definition of it would only make it more obscure.[1] Nevertheless, here I will offer my own definition of imagination. It is not necessarily exclusive of others; I give it to emphasize what I take to be imagination’s central work, and also to make clear how it is a different way of understanding the imagination. I take it from the writer Colin Wilson. Imagination, he said, is ‘the ability to grasp realities that are not immediately present’. Not an escape from reality, or a substitute for it, but a deeper engagement with it. We could also say that imagination is simply our ability to grasp reality, or even, in some strange way, to create it, or at least to collaborate in its creation; with whom or what we will look at further on. For the moment let us limit ourselves to the first formulation.

It is because we need imagination to grasp reality – that part of it immediately before us, and its wider horizons that exceed the reach of our physical senses – that we can speak of a ‘knowledge’ of the imagination. Imagination has a noetic character; it is the source and medium of our other way of knowing. It shows us aspects and dimensions of reality that we would miss without it – and which much, if not most of official western culture has missed since the new way of knowing became dominant. While it can be used for fantasy, illusion, make-believe, and escapism, the real work of imagination is to make contact with the strange world in which we live and to serve as both guide and inspiration for our development within it. It is the way we evolve. Imagination presents us with possible, potential realities that it is our job to actualize. It also presents us with a world that would not be complete without our help.

Let us look then for this lost knowledge of the imagination, and see how much of it we can find.

 

[1] It is a phenomenon, in Sir William Grove’s words, ‘so obvious to simple apprehension that to define it would make it more obscure’. Quoted in Samuel Butler ‘Thought and Language’ in The Importance of Language ed. Max Black (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1969) p. 13.

Dark Politics and Lost Imaginations

This Wednesday, March 7th, I’ll be taking part in a live-streamed event with Evolve and Ascend: Dark Politics: Imagination, Magic and Power in the Age of Trump. I’ll be interviewed by Jeremy Johnson about my new books, Lost Knowledge of the Imagination and the forthcoming Dark Star Rising: Magick and Power in the Age of Trump. Jeremy is a brilliant writer, researcher and interviewer and I expect the exchange to be thought-provoking. We will be taking calls from listeners.

Also, Watkins Books has posted the video of my recent talk there about Lost Knowledge. 

There, you have all you need to get spring on the road.

Lost Knowledge at Steiner House, Audible Imagination, and Swedenborg’s Correspondence.

I’ve posted a short video of  the Question and Answer session following my recent talk at Rudolf Steiner House on YouTube . Here’s the link. I’m aiming to post more of the talk sometime soon, and to record future talks and make those available too. It’s a slow process and while I am not a technophobe, I know why I studied the Humanities.

I’ve also recently agreed a deal with Thirteen Ventures Limited, of Toronto, Canada, for them to produce an audio book version of Lost Knowledge of the Imagination. Mark Jeftovic, the man in charge, has had success with his earlier audio ventures, but Lost Knowledge  is, I think, a new departure. I look forward to hearing the finished product, and with any luck others will too.

And last week I submitted my 10,000 word essay on ‘Swedenborg’s Correspondences’, to the Swedenborg Society, who commissioned me to write it for a new series of short books they are launching, dealing with different aspects of Swedenborg’s huge body of work. The idea of correspondences is at the heart of Swedenborg’s vision, and it is an idea that has had an enormous influence on western culture over the last two centuries. I take a look at Swedenborg’s influence on Baudelaire and the Symbolist movement, his own correspondences with the western Hermetic tradition, and ask how his ideas may be of help to us today, in the early years of the post-truth world.

Legalize Freedom with Colin Wilson

Greg Moffitt has posted the third part of our discussion about the life and work of Colin Wilson, based on my book Beyond the Robot: The Life and Work of Colin Wilson, on his popular Legalize Freedom site. Like myself, Greg is a dedicated Wilson reader, something that comes through in his comments and questions. Wilson’s antipathy to the ‘socially conscious’ – read left wing – sensibilities of many of his early contemporaries starts us off, which seems apt for our own time, when practically everything has taken on an unfortunate political character. Personal growth and development versus political ideologies and utopias: that seems a significant contrast today, and much of what Wilson had to say is applicable to our own situation. And if you’ll allow me the plug, I touch on some of this in Dark Star Rising: Magick and Power in the Age of Trump, which will be coming out this summer.

In other news, I’ve been asked by the Swedenborg Society to contribute to a series of short works, exploring the many areas of the eighteenth century Swedish savant’s work. I’ll be writing a long essay on the notion of ‘correspondences’, which is central to Swedenborg’s vision of a earthly, physical realm informed by links to the higher spheres. I’ve talked about this in other books – Swedenborg: An Introduction to His Life and Ideas and A Dark Muse (aka: The Dedalus Book of the Occult: A Dark Muse) – and of course the idea of correspondences is a central theme in the western esoteric tradition. I will place Swedenborg within this tradition and look at how his ideas influenced people like the French poet Charles Baudelaire, who took them and, with some borrowing from Edgar Allan Poe and the the German fantasist E.T.A. Hoffmann, invented Symbolism.